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Manually injecting rows to an ODI journal table

29 May 2015

Jason shares how to do this here...

Earlier this year I did an absolute whirlwind crash course on ODI journalization. In that article I talked about the layout of tables that ODI uses to track changes in particular tables (for simple journalization with one table). You may recall that changed (inserted, updated, deleted) rows are tracked in this table. This is done by way of some metadata as well as the primary key of the monitored table.

Typically after your processing is done, the entries from the ODI journal table that were processed will be deleted. Occasionally, however, you may need to manually fix the ODI journal table. For me this sometimes involves “manually injecting” rows to the journal table. You could achieve this in a couple of ways. This way we can force some rows to process that otherwise wouldn’t be processed because ODI doesn’t consider them to be new or updated.

The first way is to “touch” the rows in the monitored table in some way so that the trigger installed on that table gets activated and inserts rows to the ODI journal table. You could perform some sort of dummy update on a row. This can work but isn’t always desirable.

Another technique and the one I’ll talk about in this post is to manually add rows to the journal table that contain the primary key of the row to be processed. The trick, then, is what to fill in for the other values of the columns?

Recall that the general format of a table is the subscriber name, a consumed flag, the date it went into the table, whether it’s an insert or a delete, and the primary key of the row being journalized.

As an example, assuming the journal table is called J$TEST_CODE_RESULT (for a real table of TEST_CODE_RESULT), and also assuming a primary key name of TEST_CODE_RESULT_ID (that in this case is an integer), we can add a row to the journal table like this:

INSERT INTO TEST_CODES.J$TEST_CODE_RESULT VALUES ('TEST_CODE_PROCESSING', 0, 'I', sysdate, 12345);

The first value is the JRN_SUBSCRIBER. This corresponds to the name of the subscriber setup in the ODI journalizing and is also the same as the filter you use in the interface to get rows for just your particular subscriber. Next is the JRN_CONSUMED field which we set to 0 (during processing, ODI will change this to 1 to indicate it’s working on that data), the character ‘I’ (upper case i) to indicate the row was an insert or update, the current time (this assumes an Oracle database), and finally, the ID of the row we need to inject.

You can of course also insert as many rows as you want such as by writing an INSERT that gets values from a SELECT. Every now and then if you have a lot of rows you need to reprocess you might find yourself with a table that has the IDs, and you can just insert them into this table and they’ll get picked up on the next run.

 

Source: Jason's Hyperion Blog

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